sometimesiamcreative:

For my Design and Production class, myself and the other ceramic students in the class worked with a local restaurant, A Tavola, to design dinnerware, decoration and other custom items for the restaurant. My project was candle holders, which are made up of stacking sections to create landscapes (anyone familiar with New Paltz will recognize the Mohonk Tower), and translucent porcelain to create that nice glow. We had an event to unveil our work, and while this was possibly my most exhausting class, it was super rewarding. 

Inspired by local landscapes, the glow of candlelight, and the warm atmosphere of A Tavola Trattoria, Skyscapes are truly a product of New Paltz, New York. The silhouette of the Shawangunk Mountains can be seen behind fields and trees, above the village skyline, or can be exchanged with landmarks like the Mohonk Mountain House. Interchangeable sets allow for a playful variety while maintaining unity among multiple table settings. Translucent porcelain pairs with earthy reds and browns for a low luminosity that will help bring warmth to the table.

sometimesiamcreative:

For my Design and Production class, myself and the other ceramic students in the class worked with a local restaurant, A Tavola, to design dinnerware, decoration and other custom items for the restaurant. My project was candle holders, which are made up of stacking sections to create landscapes (anyone familiar with New Paltz will recognize the Mohonk Tower), and translucent porcelain to create that nice glow. We had an event to unveil our work, and while this was possibly my most exhausting class, it was super rewarding. 

Inspired by local landscapes, the glow of candlelight, and the warm atmosphere of A Tavola Trattoria, Skyscapes are truly a product of New Paltz, New York. The silhouette of the Shawangunk Mountains can be seen behind fields and trees, above the village skyline, or can be exchanged with landmarks like the Mohonk Mountain House. Interchangeable sets allow for a playful variety while maintaining unity among multiple table settings. Translucent porcelain pairs with earthy reds and browns for a low luminosity that will help bring warmth to the table.

sometimesiamcreative:

For my Design and Production class, myself and the other ceramic students in the class worked with a local restaurant, A Tavola, to design dinnerware, decoration and other custom items for the restaurant. My project was candle holders, which are made up of stacking sections to create landscapes (anyone familiar with New Paltz will recognize the Mohonk Tower), and translucent porcelain to create that nice glow. We had an event to unveil our work, and while this was possibly my most exhausting class, it was super rewarding. 

Inspired by local landscapes, the glow of candlelight, and the warm atmosphere of A Tavola Trattoria, Skyscapes are truly a product of New Paltz, New York. The silhouette of the Shawangunk Mountains can be seen behind fields and trees, above the village skyline, or can be exchanged with landmarks like the Mohonk Mountain House. Interchangeable sets allow for a playful variety while maintaining unity among multiple table settings. Translucent porcelain pairs with earthy reds and browns for a low luminosity that will help bring warmth to the table.

newpaltztheatrekid:

Hello, all 11 of you! I’ve been off the map, and I apologize, it’s been a crazy semester. There’s too much to say about the events that have occurred since I last posted, so I’ll summarize with a list:

    • New Paltz Theatre Department alum Alex Eisen’s play, The Dark I Know, was very well received as part of the Midtown International Theatre Festival, and had over half of its company come from the New Paltz program
    • An overwhelming amount of our current students and recent alumni worked on TDIK, Shrek and/or Spamalot somewhere in at one or two of various theaters.
    • McKenna theatre flooded, and we saved it, like the bosses we are.

Class Warfare in Academe

image

By Peter D.G. Brown, Distinguished Service Professor of German Emeritus at the State University of New York at New Paltz and president of the New Paltz chapter of United University Professions. 

Inside Higher Ed:

Take the State University of New York, for example. Its top academic officer, David Lavallee, recently stepped down from his position as executive vice chancellor for academic affairs and provost. Lavallee is currently on a six-month “study leave” while continuing to receive his full salary of $316,000 per year. Despite repeated Freedom of Information Law requests, SUNY has been unable to produce a single document detailing the purpose of this “study leave.”

Lavallee, age 66, will return next spring to his former campus at SUNY New Paltz and receive ten-twelfths of the $199,000 salary he had previously received when he was provost at that college. As the second-highest-paid employee on campus, Lavallee won’t be working either as a teacher or as an administrator. Instead, he’ll be conducting a few leadership workshops, mentoring one lecturer and “building candidate lists for senior leadership positions.” This is one example of the extremely generous packages that many senior system administrators arrange to take with them when they return to their home campuses. 

Inside The Brewery at Bacchus

drinkhv:

image

Bacchus in New Paltz has long been the bastion for good beer in the quintessential college town of New Paltz.  Long before the Gilded Otter brewpub, Bacchus has been slinging the good stuff, even if they weren’t making it themselves like their neighbors.  Until now.

Now fully licensed as a restaurant brewery, Bacchus has begun concocting their own beers on a small 100 gallon system nestled in the back of the kitchen. With such small batches, the few kegs that get put on tap at the bar are gone quick.  I still haven’t been lucky to sample any myself, but I was lucky enough on my latest visit to meet owner Linda and the co-brewers themselves, Mike and Jason. 

Conflict waiver granted to IDA attorney on Park Point PILOT

image

By Roberto LoBianco

A $56 million, 732-bed housing complex would fulfill what SUNY New Paltz college administrators have identified as a “critical need:” housing for commuter and transfer students. According to the college, New Paltz has one of the lowest rates of housing availability among SUNY schools.

But much of residents’ ire regarding the project has stemmed from Wilmorite applying for a Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT). The company partnered with New Paltz’s non-profit foundation to construct the complex.

The Ulster County Industrial Development Agency (IDA), a six-member board appointed by the county legislature, revised its rules in September 2012 to allow dormitory projects, like Wilmorite’s Park Point, to qualify for the PILOT tax exemption program. The changes were made, “to mirror what IDAs are doing state wide,” according to Steve Perfit, the board’s treasurer.

Six months earlier, at the board’s March 14, 2012 meeting, Joseph Scott, the IDA’s attorney, requested a “Waiver of Conflict of Interest” in order to continue to act as counsel in the IDA’s future dealings with Wilmorite.